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Many of you will know Pat Flynn from his Smart Passive Income Blog. In 2015, he encountered a problem with his podcast. He wanted to enable visitors to his website to listen to any episode from his show, right there, on his site. The more Flynn looked, the options were sparse and ugly. So with a team of friends, he built the podcast player that he wanted.

It was initially called the Smart Podcast Player. But it has since evolved into Fusebox. The powerful WordPress podcast player now has a transcript plugin too. What I like most about the players is the SEO-friendly live text, which gives search engines like Google what they love—live text they can crawl.

Upon recording my daily podcasts, I create a blog post for each episode that I can promote on my website. Rather than build an audience social media platforms that use algorithms to determine what traffic comes your way, it’s crucial to have your own website that you control. But here are the three smart podcast players in action.

The first is a full player that enables listeners to scroll through all of your episodes.

What I love most about the players is the SEO-friendly live text, which gives search engines like Google what they love—live text they can crawl. The built-in email capture tool on the Fusebox Podcast Player enables your visitors to sign up for your email list. It also integrates with email marketing services, including Aweber, ConvertKit, MailChimp, and all the usual suspects. 

Fusebox Transcript plugin doesn’t transcribe your podcast. The plugin displays your transcriptions, giving your transcribed podcast a beautiful front end with an option for your users to download. It’s not transcription software. But there are many online options such as Otter.Ai, Rev or Temi to help transcribe your episodes.

I often upload the podcast MP3 file into Otter.AI to transcribe the episode for free. I then remove any errors and clean it up in Grammarly and finally add to the Fusebox Transcript plugin. It somehow manages to make displaying transcripts on your website both elegant and straightforward.

Check out the example below that enables listeners to save my episode transcript in easy-to-access PDF format and download the MP3 file.

After meeting Daniel Burrus in Las Vegas for the Dynatrace Perform event in February, Neil talks with Dan about how much the world has changed in the last few months. Together we look at how businesses can thrive and survive in a new era of uncertainty.
Danieål Burrus - Tech Talks Daily Podcast

You can also subscribe to the Tech Talks Daily Podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and all major podcasting platforms.

Neil Hughes:

So a massive warm welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners a little about who you are and what you do?

Dan:

Well, I'm really excited to be here with you on this and I give quite a few speeches around the world about the future and about how to solve impossible problems, see invisible opportunities and how actually amazingly predictable the future is. I do a lot of consulting with fortune 50, fortune 100 companies. I do that globally, in just about every industry, really helping executives to see new game changing opportunities. A lot of it is coming from technology, but you can't ignore the people part. So it's really how do you get the people's minds adjusted, whether they're executives or the lowest or highest or mid level employees, so that they take true advantage in shaping a positive future.

Dan:

And if you really wanted to get right down to it, my goal all together is to get us to all be much more anticipatory and much less reactive because so many things come through is so fast, you can't react fast enough. And that's why we need to be able to start anticipating problems before we have them, so we can resolve them and anticipating disruptions before they disrupt, giving you the choice to be either the disruptor or the disrupted. That's what I'm really trying to help people do.

Neil Hughes:

And there are so many different reasons that I'm excited to get you on here today because I have followed you for some time Dan, and I also was very fortunate to see you speak recently at the Dynatrace Perform event in Las Vegas, which let's be honest, feels like an absolute lifetime away. And spotting disruption or any potential changes in the future, I had no idea what was coming and we will talk about some of that in just a moment and why things have changed so much. But for anyone unfamiliar with your work, can you just bring everyone up to speed with how you spot those trends?

Dan:

Yes. Well again, as you know from the introduction, I've started six companies over the years that have done really well, before that, not in the introduction, I taught biology and physics. So really I'm a science guy that applies that rigor to my methodologies. There's a lot of people out there that call themselves futurists and let's face it, all you got to do is make a prediction and in a way you're a futurist. To get paid to be a futurist, you have to be right every now and then. And I've been doing this for 36 years now, written again, seven best selling books, thousands of articles published.

Dan:

And the reason I've had a track record of being right about where things are going over such a long period of time, is a couple of reasons. One, I leave out the parts I can be wrong about. What's amazing of course is how much can be right about when you have a methodology. And that's what I have. Basically to give it to you very quickly and to frame up our discussion, there's no shortage of trends. And as a matter of fact, with the recent outbreak of the Coronavirus, we have a lot of new trends that are developing and it's hard to tell from a trend whether it's going to happen or not and what's the impact? What I've done is come up with a methodology that has proven itself to be really powerful and that is all trends can be put into one of two categories. Either they're a hard trend based on a future fact that will happen.

Dan:

And by the way, the advantage of that is you can see change and disruption coming before it hits and you have a chance to pre solve predictable problems. You can see disruptions coming before they disrupt, again, giving you some opportunities to become the disruptor instead of let yourself be disrupted by default. The other kind of trend is a soft trend and a soft trend is based on an assumption about the future that may or may not be true. Obviously some are better than others and in my books, including my latest one, The Anticipatory Organization, I talk more about how to separate that. I love hard trends. I love soft trends. And the reason is, and this is another important point for all of our listeners and that is, a trend hard or soft, by itself has no power. In other words, it's an academic exercise. That's why a lot of us don't spend time talking about trends. However, when you attach an opportunity to a trend, it bursts into actionable life. So first of all, never talk about a trend unless you have a related opportunity.

Dan:

So a hard trend has the opportunities to take advantage of those things that haven't happened yet, but will happen. And a soft trend, the opportunities are to influence them in a positive way because there are some soft friends that are negative, there's some soft trends that are positive. And if it's a positive soft trend that means you might like it, but it doesn't mean it's for sure. An example of a positive soft trend, you've had 20% sales growth year after year, which is really high. But I know some companies that are doing that well or maybe it's more like 5% or 10% and you've done that year over year and your forecast for 2020 was that kind of growth again, because that's what you've done in the past and you're doing the same kind of things. By the way, that's soft trend. Obviously the Coronavirus has shown that is definitely soft.

Dan:

The key is how do we influence that in a positive way? So matter of fact, let's take a little step on that right now and say the spread of the pandemic has caused all of those sales forecasts to be out the window. They're all going down. By the way, do we have to ride them down? By the way, it's also a soft trend. You can do something about that. You could turn that around or you could ride it out. So in other words, soft trends are powerful, if you don't like it, you can change it. Hard trends are powerful because you can see and turn change and disruption into an opportunity and an advantage. So that is really what I'm trying to do and that'll frame up our discussion.

Neil Hughes:

And for any business leaders or decision makers listening to our conversation today, do you have any quick examples of soft trends and hard trends just to help them completely grasp that concept?

Dan:

Sure. Well, let's talk about hard trends first. There are, to make it simple, really there are three categories of hard trends. One of them is technology and that, again, I've been speaking and writing about that for a long, long time. So is artificial intelligence and machine learning, is that something that is a fad here today and gone tomorrow or is that a hard trend that will get exponentially more powerful every year, regardless of the Coronavirus? And the answer is A, the exponential growth of technology is not slowing because of a virus, it's going to continue. That is a hard trend. And by the way, remember, you have to have an opportunity tied to that. So you might look at, well, how could I take advantage of that if I'm a medium or a small business or an entrepreneur, when I don't have a budget to afford AI? And the answer is you don't need a budget to afford AI.

Dan:

It's another principle I teach, is take your problem and skip it. We just skipped it. And how do you skip it? Well, for example, you can get access to AI for free by using Alexa. That of course is Amazon's AI system and they have made that open source and they've said, "Look, you don't have to pay for our stuff. You can just use it." They've even given you a code to tap in and write your own rules and put in your own information into it. And as a matter of fact, you don't even have to buy the hardware that the chat bot Alexa is using, you can use your own chips and use their AI to empower it. Let me give you a quick example so that I'm really making this solid. I shared this about a year and a half ago with a heating and air conditioning company in the United States and they decided to enable that Alexa in all of their industrial thermostats.

Dan:

So in other words, let's say that you are in a hotel and you're in a meeting and the room is kind of cold, too cold. Normally got to find somebody from the hotel that can turn it up. But if you bought this guy's stuff, all you do is say the key word, may not be Alexa, but whatever word you want and say raise the temperature five degrees and it'll go up. By the way, that company is doing really well and expanded their market tremendously and didn't have to pay Amazon for anything. My point is, I just gave you one quick example of a technology hard trend, there are many. By the way, if any of your listeners would be interested in my list of technology driven hard trends, you can go to Burrus, B-U-R-R-U-S.com and there's a little place on the homepage where you can click and download a free copy.

Dan:

The other two categories of hard trends are demographics, and we have in many nations, not at all, an aging population. In the United States, for example, there are 78 million baby boomers, hard trend, they're not going to get younger. In Europe, we've got many baby boomers. That's why again, the Coronavirus is a worry. Hey, we got a lot of baby boomers out there and many of them are aging and they have parents and a lot of them aren't in real good health. Again, another worry for the spread of the pandemic and why we're trying to lock it down. So there are a lot of problems we could predict and pre solve or we could let them play out. Let me give you a very quick example. Many people in your organization will be retiring, especially if you're in a country that has an aging demographic and they'll be taking their knowledge and wisdom with them.

Dan:

Now, I'm just giving you a moment where I can teach you all something and that is, when you're reading or writing a trend, if you see the word and or there's a comma, there's probably two trends there. One is hard, one, is not. Usually the first one is hard, the second one is soft. Let's go to the one I just gave you. Many people in your organization will be retiring. That's a hard trend. Guaranteed. Heck in the United States are 10,000 people a day retiring, and that was before the virus. How about the second part of that, and they'll take their knowledge and wisdom with them. Well, that's actually a soft trend. You could do something about that or you could let them take their knowledge and wisdom with them. For example, you could create a knowledge base, you could create a wisdom base, you can do mentoring. There's all sorts of things you could do to capture that knowledge and wisdom before they leave. You get the idea. I hope.

Dan:

The third and last category of hard trends is government regulation and by the way, we are going to continue to get regulations. You can't predict everything accurately. There's some things you can't see, but there are many things you can, and I'm not empowered by all the things that I don't know, all the things I can't predict, I'm empowered by all the things I am certain about, all the things I can see. For example, will we, and I don't care what country you're in, will you get more regulation around cybersecurity? Answer is yes. How do you know that? Because there are some hard trends at play, they're going to force governments to do that. Now there are many other government regulations that there's going to be debate about and they may or may not happen because they're politically based.

Dan:

However, there are some hard trend-based regulations that can't be ignored and again, you've got a time opportunity to that. You asked for examples, I know I'm giving you kind of a long answer, but I'm also trying to use this as a teaching moment. A soft trend might be how fast the Coronavirus spreads and right now we know that we're all getting a lesson in exponential. I've been writing and speaking about exponential technology since 1983 and how two becomes four becomes eight and how in the beginning it's slow, but then it ramps up really fast. Right now the world is getting a lesson in exponential from the virus, two becomes four become eight. Every three days, the virus doubles, if you don't lock down the country and stop people from moving around, if you lock down the country, that's how you change a soft trend, you can lock it down and control it.

Dan:

If people are still moving around, every three days it'll double and the death toll, that percent of dead, people that will die is small, but that's going to rise at an exponential level too. It's all going to rise unless we do something about it. A perfect example of a soft trend. In the United States, we're not locked down. Some states are moving to lockdown like California and a few others because the federal government and the White House is not locking us down fully yet. We're still doing things and traveling around and people are going to restaurants and bars in states that haven't locked down. Until the United States locks down like China did, we will not be able to get control. And every three days that we wait, it all just doubled again.

Dan:

So in other words, it's imperative to lock down. By the way, I think you're getting good news, there was a report today saying, "Oh good news out of China, they have no new reported cases." And then they went on saying, "Oh, that must mean there's going to be an end to it." Which of course is bad reporting because they didn't add, by the way, they locked 10 million people down to make that happen, with no movement and that's why they are not having reported cases. So that's a really good example of a soft trend and how you can let it play out, might everybody gets sick and have millions of people dying. I think I've estimated, looking at the numbers, that in the United States, if we don't fully locked down, no air, no trains, nothing moving, we will have over a million fatalities by the end of the year, the costs will be high. But we could not have that if we act quick and everyday counts in doubling.

Dan:

All right. I really have been giving you a really long answer Neil. But I'm a teacher at heart as you can tell. I'd rather not just say here's some trends, good luck guys, but kind of teach you a little bit. And with that said, let me just give you what I'd like people to do. And that is why don't you take at least an hour a week because that's doable and in that hour, instead of looking at all the things you're uncertain about, why don't you make a list of things that you are certain about. That way you can find certainty in a hard trend. Because and remember a trend by itself isn't powerful if you don't tie an opportunity to it. And when you start looking at separating the hard trends from the soft trends and you really look at those opportunities, big lists never get done. Boil it down to one or two things and make it happen. Because if you don't do it, someone else will.

Dan:

And a leadership principle I'll share with everyone listening right now and that is because many of us are trying to lead our people through very difficult times and that is if there's high levels of uncertainty, people don't follow real well. What they do is follow when there's certainty. So we need to be sharing future facts. We need to be giving them the truth. And if you are talking in terms of future facts, hard trends, and you're also talking about soft trends and how we can influence them in a positive way, people will get the confidence that comes from certainty, to be able to make bold moves. So right now it's an imperative as a leader, to make your hard trend list, find those things that you are absolutely certain about and speak in those terms to your people so that they'll have the confidence to make the bold moves you would like them to make.

Neil Hughes:

There's so much value in that answer there. There really is. And I'm so glad that you brought up some of the topics in there because I think even the most forward thinking business leader that's carefully made a note of all those soft and hard trends and attempting to anticipate disruption before it arrives, even those people have been blindsided by what's happened with the Coronavirus pandemic. And it has become a global concern now to every business and every industry, especially when it feels completely outside of their control. So can there still be certainty during these highly volatile times do you think?

Dan:

Well, absolutely. By the way, I shared one with you already and that is, it's certain the virus will double every three days, we already know that, if we don't lock it down. There's a certainty right there. But notice I mentioned there's a strategy you could attach to it to get a good result. Lock it down. And there's a penalty for not doing it. What about your business right now? Let's say you're a restaurant or a bar or let's say you're in some business that's all of a sudden getting shut down or you're closed down. Nobody's moving, nobody's buying. You have an amazing opportunity right in front of you and that is to look at your customers and your customer's customers. They're all hurting. By the way, that's a certainty. They're all loaded with uncertainty and not sure what to do. When you've got customers and a customer's customer, that is really in pain and in trouble, you have an amazing opportunity to help them.

Dan:

You have an amazing opportunity to grow your brand. You have an amazing opportunity to do and to step out and not just be an ordinary company or an ordinary person, but to do something extraordinary. And you don't start up by saying, "Hey, I want to help you out. Here's the fee." Because that would be the wrong way to go. The right way to go is to reach out with some ideas for them because you've done a little pre-work on what are the hard trends, what are the soft trends that'll impact them. Found some certainty that you can share with them in a way that you might be able to help them and say, "Look, I normally would charge for this. I'm not going to charge for it right now because I care about you. You're a customer and I just want to help you through this." And believe me, if you're coming when they're in need and not with your hand out looking for money and you're offering some really good solid tips that can help them, they're going to remember that and they're going to do business with you.

Dan:

This is a chance for you to grow your brand and if you're an individual, if you're an entrepreneur, roll up your sleeves and look at where can you make a difference because all over, there's differences that need to be made. You should be doing it. And let me just give you one last comment. I think everyone has been focused on being successful. Our businesses, we're trying to be successful, as a person, we're trying to be successful. And I believe that that always limits you as a human, as a person, as an individual, as a business. So instead of focusing on being a successful business and a successful leader, I want you to shift now to being a significant business and a significant leader because success is all about you, significance is about what you do for others. This is the time to focus on being significant and that starts by thinking and helping others. And by the way, if you elevate your significance, you'll find yourself being far more successful. So instead of success being the goal, significance is the goal, success is one of the after elements of being significant.

Neil Hughes:

And five years ago, IBM said that the last best experience that anyone has anywhere, then becomes the minimum expectation for the experience that they want everywhere. But of course customers and younger audiences are now bringing those very same expectations into the workplace and seem to be blurring the lines between B2B and B2C. So can you tell me more why you believe a multi generational mindset is actually crucial right now?

Dan:

Well, it is. First of all, the minute that you think you won, you probably lost. Yeah. When you're at the very top, that's probably the worst place to be because you might start thinking, your ego might get blown out and you might be thinking, "Hey, we're the best." The minute you think you're the best, you're in trouble again because there's always somebody that can redefine and reinvent and become more relevant than you. So I think the key is, there's a lot of us, a lot of businesses have been coasting, trouble is you can only coast downhill.

Dan:

So I want us to instead realize we've never had more opportunity than right now, to do something really powerful, even in this particular pandemic time period, where everything's being stressed. So it's time to rise up and realize that there is a bigger difference that we can make. And there is more that we can do than ever before. And if we're clouded by crisis management, which most people are in right now, all looking at how am I going to make my money, how am I going to pay the bills, how am I going to do this? You will not see what I call the bigger big. You need to step back and see the bigger big so that you can create that for yourself and for others. You need to actively shape the future rather than passively receive it at this point in time.

Neil Hughes:

And another reason I was excited to get you on the podcast today is for people that don't know, The New York Times referred to you as one of the top three business gurus in the highest demand as a speaker. And I'm curious as someone that has traveled well over a million miles and spoke at countless events all over the world, are there any trends in the kind of challenges that business leaders are trying to overcome at the moment? And are there any trends in there and what kind of questions are they coming and asking you for help with?

Dan:

Well, yeah, first of all, I have been giving speeches for 36 years. I'm well over six million miles of travel. I've done a lot more than a million and I've given over 3000 keynote speeches. Last time I was in Beijing, it was 14,000 people from 36 different countries. So I've done a fair amount. And in all of that, first of all, I don't treat a speech as a static thing, I treat it as a mini consultation. So I really get my joy in tailoring it and making it meaningful for the people that I'm speaking to. And that means finding out what are the trends that they see, what are the problems that they see, so that I can see what they're missing.

Dan:

And most of us are missing a lot because when we are looking to the future, it's kind of like driving a car. We tend to be looking through the rear view mirror more than the windshield. In other words, we're using all of our past, everything we've known from our past, as a template to see the future, our past experience. Which always worked for us well, but now because the exponential growth of technology has gotten to this ballooning giant phase, causing faster and faster changes all the time, it A, makes keeping up almost impossible. That's why I think keeping up is a fool's game, I want to jump ahead with low risk. By the way, how can you jump ahead with low risk? By using the hard trends that are going to happen anyway because the bigger risk is not jumping ahead, then you're going to be stuck in yesterday and be disrupted. So you see it's a different way to think. And so I think it's not just using our rear view mirror view, but more of a windshield view.

Dan:

And I'll share a very quick little story with you that your listeners might get a kick out of. When I was a teenager, there was a, I think I was a sophomore in high school, and there was a guy who was two years older than me, getting close to graduating and he was the local wrench. What I mean by that is he liked to fix and work on his cars and make them into hot rods and cool things. Really neat. And one time he put aircraft landing lights for his high beams on his car. And of course that was very illegal because it was so bright. But we went out one night and we turned those high beams on and holy cow, it just lit up the whole world. It was like, wow, I can see so much. What I want us to do is use hard trends to illuminate your future so that you can see all those things that are right now in the darkness, that are really there and can be seen. You just can't see them. And that gives you some amazing opportunities.

Neil Hughes:

Incredibly cool. And I think we've both seen business implement new technology but then struggle with the culture change required to make that technology a success. So do you think companies underestimate how a legacy mindset is equally as damaging, if not more so than legacy tech? If that is the case, where did they begin to overcome something like that?

Dan:

Well, I remember you heard me at the Dynatrace speech a couple months ago, make that statement, and that is that legacy technology does not worry me as much as legacy thinking. And so if you have new technology and you use it in the old way, you'll under utilize it and just have spent lot. On the other hand, if you have old legacy technology but you use new thinking, you can actually do amazing things with it. I think it's more of our mindset that's the problem in really turning things around and doing good things, than it is just the technology.

Neil Hughes:

Now I've also been a fan of yours since reading one of your earlier books, Flash Foresight, and for anyone unfamiliar with your work who have not read that book, can you just talk me through the concept behind it very quickly?

Dan:

Sure. The subtitle of Flash Foresight is the key, how to see the invisible and do the impossible. So let's just think a minute. Almost everything that has been done since the dawn of time, almost everything was at one time impossible. Sitting in a chair was impossible, one time you had to find a stump to sit on. So how is it that humans have been able to redefine reality, turning the impossible into the possible, over and over and over again? And that is when you look at a problem and you get a solution that was invisible to you before, when you get a idea about something that you never thought of before, what you get is a flash of foresight that lets you move forward with confidence, where before you were stuck. So what I did was I came up with a number of principles that makes the invisible visible, allowing you to do what is perceived as impossible and that flash foresight gets you unstuck and lets you move forward.

Dan:

So in that book, I have those principles. Actually, that book was a New York Times Wall Street bestseller. It was a best seller in Beijing, was a best seller in Europe. And actually for over a month, and I don't know, there are not many books that have done this in the business world, much less as a futurist book, but I actually maintain number one in all books for over 30 days, including the nonfiction books on Amazon, which was pretty important. So it obviously people really liked that book. And my latest one, The Anticipatory Organization, how to turn disruption and change into opportunity and advantage, has been doing the same thing. Because as you can tell, I'm a storyteller and I take the principles and use story around it so that people understand how to apply it.

Neil Hughes:

So with three decades as a futurist keynote speaker, you've established this worldwide reputation for being able to accurately predict the future of technological change and most importantly, the impact on the world of business. So I've got to ask, I mean, what excites you about the future and what do you think companies should be looking out for?

Dan:

Well, what excites me is the untapped opportunity in each individual I talk to, because I don't think we've all fully tapped into what's inside of you. I think there's much more in there that you need to release and let out. And there's nothing more powerful than a vision that is based on things that are not impossible, rather things that can be converted from what is seemingly impossible to the possible. So never underestimate it. So let's face it, going to the moon surely seemed impossible in 1960, yet we did that decades and decades and decades and decades ago.

Dan:

So what truly is impossible? Well, I don't know if much is, when we put our minds to it. So I think what gets me excited is not technology, it's humans. And then I like the technology part because when we apply our creativity and our imagination to it, we can use technology to truly do amazing things, infinite things in a way. And let's face it, there's only so many keys on a piano. It's been the same since Beethoven and way before Beethoven. Yet that does not keep us from being able to come up with entirely new music. In that same way, every piece of technology can be used in unbelievable, almost infinite new ways if we don't apply legacy thinking and instead sit back and become anticipatory.

Dan:

So I get excited about converting people from being agile, which is reacting quickly after a disruption disrupts, reacting quickly after a problem occurs, which I think is important, to also, I'm using that word, importantly, don't want you to stop being agile, but I also want you to be anticipatory at identifying the problems before you have them, so you can pre solve them. If you don't, by the way, you're not going to be a happy camper on planet earth. Identifying the disruptions before they disrupt. As a matter of fact, I'd like us all to become positive disruptors, creating the transformations that need to happen to make the world a better place for yourself, for your family, for your colleagues, for business, for your customers, and for everyone. I want us to be positive disruptors.

Neil Hughes:

And a few weeks ago I was chatting to a company that host virtual conferences and over the last week things have gone absolutely insane for them because understandably, nobody's going to events anymore, so people are turning online to do virtual conferences. But then as I heard this and how they turned the current climate into a bit of an opportunity and they were struggling to scale because things were happening that quickly. It also took me back to a brief conversation I had with you in Vegas in February, where I know before any of this kicked off, you were actually hosting virtual keynote speeches using hologram technology. Could you just tell me a little bit about that, because I'm sure that will be so interesting, especially to business leaders out there looking for different ways of broadcasting their message.

Dan:

Well, yeah, there's a number of different things that are important to understand. First of all, a lot of people are thinking now all meetings will be virtual and after the pandemic is over, we're not going to have regular meetings much anymore, which would be really bad thinking. There's nothing more powerful than human to human contact and we'll get back to that. However, what we're doing now is learning much more about how to be remote and there'll be a lot more remote work as well and a lot more remote speaking. So let's just talk about the levels of that when you have a webinar. And a webinar is best used for either marketing or for training or education, I call it a digital speech, which I've done many of over the years, is where I'm on a big screen in front of a live audience, but I'm in another location and I can see the audience and I can hear the audience and they can hear me and see me.

Dan:

And again, I'm doing a digital keynote speech, which is done with different technology than some kind of a workshop or training, which would be a webinar. So you've got to work differently with that. And then the third thing that I do, so I do live, I do digital speeches, but I also do hologram speeches, which you've just referred to. And I started doing those just last year because the tech got good enough to do it. And that's where I actually been in onstage, kind of looks like the old Star Trek. I actually beam in life-sized, full size and deliver that speech. And I've done a number of those, matter of fact, I just did one a little while ago, a couple of weeks ago where I was giving a live speech and then I beamed in next to myself from the future and I had a conversation with the future me and the audience and the planners, all just loved it.

Dan:

Now of course it requires some technology to do that, but that technology predictably will get cheaper and cheaper every year just like all technology does. So I'm doing that already, love it, and if people want to know more about that, if you go to Burris, B-U-R-R-U-S.com and go to the speaking tab, you'll see a little sample of it and see how all of that looks and works.

 

In the video below, Pat Flynn walks you through this brand-new version and introduces you to all the features. But what really shines through is how he created SPP out of his desire for a reliable, customizable, and functional podcast player.

I have found that the Fusebox smart podcast player is an essential tool for growth. Essentially, it helps you create a landing page for every episode of your podcast. Bringing those pages to life with SEO rich transcripts and email capture can also help play a big part in converting search traffic into new podcast listeners.

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